Commonalities – Episode 1 – Transcript

21Nov, 2022
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Starting now.

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Commonalities where guests find
common ground through uncommon

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conversations, politics,
religion, finances,

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all the topics your grandmother told
you not to discuss with friends.

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And now your host, Matthew Dowling,

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and today's guests commonalities.

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Well, hello everyone, and
thank you for tuning in to, uh,

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our first episode of Commonalities.

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This is a show where we want to have
people that have different mindsets,

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whether it be in the world
of politics or otherwise, um,

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where they have a conversation and
try to come up with what they can

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agree on. So we wanna find
a, a common placeholder, um,

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that everyone kind of lives
by and abides by. And, uh,

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I think these conversations
are extremely important.

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I have two fantastic guests with
me today. First is Chuck Pasal,

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um, and I'm gonna let him introduce
himself in just a moment. He is a,

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a progressive, he's a Democrat.
And then, uh, a name that you,

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you may have heard because he just,
uh, ran for Lieutenant Governor.

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And our primary race is, uh, Jeff Coleman.

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He is a conservative Republican.

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So we're coming at it from
two different angles and, uh,

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gonna have our conversation today.
Chuck will let you open up with, uh,

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with kind of a little bit
of your background in some
of the things you're known

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for.

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All right. Thank you, Matt. And it's
an honor to be here on your first, uh,

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show. I, I appreciate the
invitation and, and, uh,

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obviously appreciate the invitation to
speak with my old friend, Jeff Coleman.

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Um, I am, um, uh, an active Democrat.

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I'm currently the county chairman of the
Democratic Party in Armstrong County.

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Um, but going back in time, I
was, um, a school board member in,

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um, uh, Leechburg for 16 years. I
was the mayor of Leechburg for four.

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I currently on, uh, council in
Leechburg. That's by the way,

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that's in Armstrong
County. Um, and, um, uh,

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I, I'm an attorney. Uh, I'm
a criminal defense attorney,

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as well as I do election law and as
well as some other things. And, um,

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uh, been involved in the party
since the Democratic Party,

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since I was 16 years old. Uh,

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was represented by Jeff Coleman for
a while here in Armstrong County. Uh,

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until, uh, there a rumor, uh, uh, uh,

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came up that I might run against Jeff.

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And then all of a sudden
I was redistricted out of
his district. And, and, uh,

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uh, I was the only,

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I was in the only municipality
in Armstrong County that
wasn't in his district.

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So I'm sure that was a
coincidence. But in any case, uh,

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Jeff and I have always had a good, uh, uh,

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respectful relationship
and always had fun, uh,

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on some local cable shows here in
Armstrong County. Uh, and, uh, it's,

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I'm just happy to be here with, with,
uh, uh, Jeff and, uh, you, Matt. And,

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uh, uh, we could talk about my,
some of my legal things. Uh, I've,

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I've done election law. I've done, uh,

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a lot of petition challenges on behalf
of Democrats. And, um, of course,

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I'm a leader in, in the Democratic Party.

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Been on state committee for a long time,

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and I'm currently the
county chairman here.

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Well, thank you so much, uh,
Chuck, and then Jeff, uh,

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if you wanna tell us a little
bit about your background.

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Well, I guess a little bit like Chuck.
Uh, I started, uh, my political life in,

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uh, as a teenage Republican and
then a young Republican and, uh,

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a Republican committee
man. And, uh, I was,

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I was 13 years old when I signed
up for my first, uh, campaign.

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Um, my dad was a pastor of a
little Presbyterian church in, uh,

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in Southern Armstrong County in
Apollo. And, uh, my mom is where,

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where I get my hair from
is a Filipino, and, uh,

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there weren't that many
Filipinos in Armstrong County.

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And so it wasn't a natural
starting point, uh,

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for Republic office. But, uh, went,
went away to Liberty University,

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it came home and, uh, challenged,
uh, an incumbent Democrat, uh,

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who had been in office in some form,
uh, for the better part of my lifetime.

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And, uh, was fortunate enough to
be able to, to win an election,

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a couple of points, um, over the 50% line.

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And, uh, really just meeting
people, knocking on doors, um,

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asking for their support. And I needed to,

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to get a significant number of
Democrats to cross over and vote for me.

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So this isn't a new conversation from
me. Chuck and I, uh, our friendship,

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uh, I mean, he was at my wedding. So
we're, we're more than than just, uh,

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occasional sparring partners. You know,

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this is a person that I have a
lot of respect for, um, knows,

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know that at the end of a conversation
we can really disagree on some,

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some core things about how we view
budgets or taxes or social issues

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or, um, education. But in the end,

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say that there is a lot
more that we have in common.

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We care a lot about the same things, uh,

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but maybe where we come at it is a little
different. Um, so as you mentioned,

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Matt, I ran for Lieutenant Governor
this past year after being out of, um,

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office for about 17 years. And, uh,

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politics had changed a lot significantly,

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just in that little span
where it is not just trill and

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loud and name calling, but
it's gotten so deeply bitter.

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And there are very few places that
you can travel anywhere where you

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will have a conversation with
a Democrat or a Republican. Um,

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you're not gonna find a
Democrat in a, in a church.

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Often that's predominantly
Republican, vice versa. Um,

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very few working environments now.

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People can't even talk about politics
because it gets so bitter. Uh,

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and then our Thanksgiving day,
um, is divided in America.

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So we're, we're, we're Chuck
and I, and I know you are, uh,

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Matt,

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looking for ways to stitch together
a conversation where at least we

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can get back to civil and reasonable
debate on things that really matter.

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Yeah, and,

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and Chuck and I were talking before we
went live here with the show today. Uh,

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a little bit about, uh, working across
the aisle, and I was just saying, um,

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you know, I'm retiring this
year, but also retiring is, uh,

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my neighbor in the
legislature, Pam Snyder,

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and Pam and I have had a
great working relationship.

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And sometimes having a conversation with
someone from across the aisle actually

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makes you think a little bit harder
about why your priorities are where

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they are. And that's why I think
it's so important for us to have, uh,

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conversations like this today.

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We do have to get a quick
sponsorship break in, and, uh,

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we'll be back in just a couple
minutes when we come back,

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we're gonna be talking about kind of the
ideal setting, what we're looking for,

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uh, in the political
landscape here in the future.

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So we'll be back in just a moment.

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You're listening to commonalities
or guests find common ground through

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Uncommon Conversations.

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Well, you're listening to
commonalities on WBS five 90 am

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1 0 1 0.1 fm, and any place
you download your podcasts,

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uh, find us in the Apple
Podcast store or on Amazon. Um,

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I'm with Jeff Coleman today.
Uh, he's a Republican that, uh,

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recently ran for Lieutenant
Governor and Chuck Pasco.

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Chuck is a Democrat and
chair of his county party.

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Um, so gentlemen, we wanna talk a
little bit about the ideal, and,

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uh, Jeff, maybe I'll, I'll let
you start our conversation.

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Well, I think the ideal is that you have
two, uh, two, maybe three, maybe four,

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but at least two, uh,

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schools have thought that are represented
on borough councils and legislatures

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at the national level, uh,

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where you have a philosophical divide
where you look at the a problem and you

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say, all right, we can go this
way. We can go that way. And then,

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and then you begin to
say, uh, each side, uh,

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has to find out how do you get to at
least a little bit of what the other side

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wants that you have. There's
a bit of a tug of war,

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and then you have a civil process
with rules that govern it, decorum,

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uh, there are Gavels and
Roberts rules of order. And, um,

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in our case, uh, Matthew, um, the, uh,

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Mason's manual that are the
guardrails around the debate that

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keep it from turning personal, you
know, the, the rules that say, um,

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we have to say the gentleman from, or
the gentle lady from, or Mr. Speaker,

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Madame Chairman.

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Those are the kinds of things that
people are often saying, well,

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why do we have to be so nice and
kind to each other? You know,

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why can we just get down to the
heart of the issue and put gloves on?

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The problem is the people that were
sworn to represent Borough Council

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Legislature, Congress, um,

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don't have any action on the issues
that they are looking to have resolved.

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And so the ideal is working
cooperative, controlled fighting,

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uh, fighting with rules that don't,

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that don't aim to destroy the other
person or eliminate them from the

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discussion.

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And Chuck, what does the ideal in the
political landscape look like to you?

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As Jeff was kind of alluding to, you know,

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those of us that are in local government,

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and Jeff was in local government before
he, he, he went to the legislature,

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uh, on school boards. Well, I mean,
school board is less so now, but,

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but for the most part, but
Borough Council, et cetera,

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there is no Democrat or
Republican way to fix a playground

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or to fix a pothole or to pave a
street, right? Uh, on my council,

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there are four Democrats and three
Republicans. Okay? We all get along.

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We're all there for one purpose,

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and that's to do what's the best thing
for our community and the people in our

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community. And we talk to
each other. And, you know,

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when we see each other, you know, out
somewhere, we'll have a beer together,

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or we, after the meetings, we'll
go out for a drink together.

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And that's the way it should be.
We're all there for the same purpose.

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Now in the legislature,

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and I know a lot of people
in the legislature on both
sides of the aisle and in

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Congress lately, in the last 10,
20 years, maybe a little longer,

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we've started to get to the point where
the sides really don't talk to each

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other anymore. It used to be when I,
when I first got involved years ago, I,

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you know, in, in the, in the
eighties, I knew in the nineties,

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I knew that that legislators
on both sides of the aisle,

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they would fight like hell on
the floor and in committee,

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and then they'd be able to go out for
dinner together and go out and have a,

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have a drink together and talk to each
other, and they were friends, right?

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And that's how it needs to be. Again,

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what we've gotten to now is there's
so much vitriol and so much like

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distrust to the other side and, and,

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and making the other side a demonn or
whatever, and it starts in the campaigns.

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But it, but for some reason, you know,
we've always had tough campaigns,

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but then it, it,

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00:14:16,760 --> 00:14:21,280
but now it translated over into
distrust among colleagues in the house

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00:14:21,860 --> 00:14:25,240
and, and, and the senate and, and
both the state and federal level.

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00:14:25,660 --> 00:14:28,680
And nothing gets done.
Nothing of value gets done,

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00:14:29,260 --> 00:14:33,280
and bills are ramp brew on party
line votes without real discussion

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00:14:34,060 --> 00:14:37,560
and votes. And, and,
and then we, you know,

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00:14:37,560 --> 00:14:40,800
then we read the bills and we're
like, well, they missed this.

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00:14:40,800 --> 00:14:44,320
There's the hole in this, this
thing's badly drafted, whatever.

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00:14:44,850 --> 00:14:49,320
Whereas if everybody talked
to each other along the way,

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00:14:50,130 --> 00:14:54,880
as friends, as colleagues
who disagree, no doubt,

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00:14:55,140 --> 00:14:57,560
who have philosophical
differences, no doubt.

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00:14:58,380 --> 00:15:01,960
But if they talked to each other and
trusted each other and liked each other as

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friends, we could, we could have
much better legislation with,

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00:15:06,670 --> 00:15:11,120
with, you know, with much less
drafting errors, much less holes,

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00:15:11,670 --> 00:15:16,040
much less problems. Because when you,
when when you pass bad legislation,

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00:15:16,300 --> 00:15:19,280
you may have fixed one problem
that you've created five more.

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Well,

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00:15:21,480 --> 00:15:26,080
and and so I want to shift our
conversation a little bit and talk about

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00:15:26,240 --> 00:15:28,120
where the system is broken.

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00:15:28,300 --> 00:15:32,480
And I want both of you to give
your perspective, but, you know,

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00:15:32,480 --> 00:15:35,520
as someone who is, is just
leaving the legislature,

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00:15:35,520 --> 00:15:40,120
something that I absolutely
hated was the weaponization

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00:15:40,250 --> 00:15:44,800
of the amendment process. Uh, and
what I mean, what I mean by that is,

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00:15:44,940 --> 00:15:47,040
you know, we refer to
him as a gotten replace.

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00:15:47,130 --> 00:15:51,480
If I'm a Republican running an
extremely conservative bill,

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00:15:51,830 --> 00:15:54,320
a Democrat will run a, uh,

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00:15:54,320 --> 00:15:58,640
an amendment that is a gut and replace
that takes all of the language of my bill

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00:15:58,640 --> 00:16:02,080
away and puts in his or hers. And, uh,

248
00:16:02,140 --> 00:16:06,800
the process of talking out
problems in legislation

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00:16:07,530 --> 00:16:10,440
is ignored because, you
know, further than talk,

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00:16:10,650 --> 00:16:14,720
we have the ability to amend
and vote on amending an A bill.

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00:16:14,860 --> 00:16:19,000
But when we've rep weaponized
that process, then we,

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00:16:19,170 --> 00:16:23,760
we don't have the ability to have
that conversation and make functional

253
00:16:23,760 --> 00:16:27,160
changes to make legislation
better. Instead,

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00:16:27,160 --> 00:16:31,400
we're simply grandstanding on one
side or the other side of the issue.

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00:16:31,740 --> 00:16:34,680
And I'll, I'll be honest with
you, in my six years experience,

256
00:16:34,990 --> 00:16:39,280
I've seen both parties do
it. So it's not just a, a, a,

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00:16:39,310 --> 00:16:42,600
a hack of one party or
the other. So, uh, Jeff,

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00:16:42,600 --> 00:16:46,880
let's go to you and talk a little bit
about where you've identified that the,

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00:16:46,880 --> 00:16:47,920
the process is broken.

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00:16:48,750 --> 00:16:53,360
I think you talked about one of the
symptoms, the amendment process there, it,

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00:16:53,980 --> 00:16:58,360
the, the vote on, um, um, the
speaker, the, I mean, any,

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00:16:58,380 --> 00:17:03,040
any vote in the legislative process or
any vote at the local borough council

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00:17:03,040 --> 00:17:07,080
level can be turned into a
weapon. And the weapon is,

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00:17:07,180 --> 00:17:10,480
I'm going to expose you or embarrass
you in your local newspaper,

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00:17:10,480 --> 00:17:14,000
or I'm gonna make sure that,
you know, I'm giving, um,

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00:17:14,000 --> 00:17:19,000
giving a line or two in your
opponent's next mail or TV commercial.

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00:17:19,810 --> 00:17:22,080
Um, and so all of it though,

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00:17:22,080 --> 00:17:27,040
comes down to the lack of personal
respect, uh, between people. If,

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00:17:27,050 --> 00:17:30,440
if, you know, look over the,
the last many, many years,

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00:17:30,440 --> 00:17:34,720
there has been a major effort to
recruit, I'm just gonna say this broadly,

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00:17:34,720 --> 00:17:39,560
people of faith to come into
the political process. So what,

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00:17:39,560 --> 00:17:44,440
what exactly does that mean, especially
for those who identify as Christians?

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00:17:44,680 --> 00:17:47,360
Shouldn't that mean
there's a lot more, uh,

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00:17:47,360 --> 00:17:52,360
love and patience and kindness
and generalists in this process?

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What you have though,

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00:17:54,170 --> 00:17:58,840
is you have people who are coming in
to make a name for themselves as a,

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00:17:59,640 --> 00:18:02,320
whatever the interest
group they represent, uh,

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00:18:02,320 --> 00:18:07,120
and then they find opponents in
the legislative body who instead of

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00:18:07,280 --> 00:18:07,950
making friends,

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00:18:07,950 --> 00:18:12,840
become examples of people
who they can go back to raise

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00:18:12,840 --> 00:18:17,040
money on, they can go back to their, you
know, their legislative districts. I,

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00:18:17,190 --> 00:18:21,880
I think a lot about this
scene on the steps of the US

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00:18:21,880 --> 00:18:23,360
capital after, uh,

284
00:18:23,360 --> 00:18:28,040
nine 11 when you had people like
Nancy Pelosi and Rick Santorum

285
00:18:28,040 --> 00:18:32,120
and all of the Republican and
Democratic members of the,

286
00:18:32,330 --> 00:18:37,040
of the House and Senate standing
on the capital steps singing

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00:18:37,040 --> 00:18:38,000
God Bless America.

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00:18:38,860 --> 00:18:43,760
And then fast forward to a
couple years ago when you had,

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00:18:44,130 --> 00:18:44,780
um,

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00:18:44,780 --> 00:18:49,240
one of the fire firebrand
conservative congresswoman and,

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00:18:49,460 --> 00:18:52,680
and, uh, a firebrand democrat, uh,

292
00:18:52,680 --> 00:18:55,960
two women standing on
the, on the same steps,

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00:18:56,520 --> 00:19:00,680
screaming at each other in front of about

294
00:19:01,100 --> 00:19:05,880
200 photographers. And both of them,
I asked people, so who won that?

295
00:19:06,270 --> 00:19:10,720
Well, both of them won because both
of them were able to raise money

296
00:19:11,460 --> 00:19:16,040
off of this theatrical moment. That's
why you have young people saying,

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00:19:16,040 --> 00:19:20,880
I don't, I don't believe politics is
a serious business. It's all a game.

298
00:19:21,220 --> 00:19:25,120
And you will say whatever you need to
say to raise money and get elected.

299
00:19:26,840 --> 00:19:31,380
You know what, one of the things
that I've always wished was, uh,

300
00:19:31,380 --> 00:19:36,380
that there was an on off switch for
campaigning because we come out of

301
00:19:36,380 --> 00:19:40,060
a campaign and, uh, you know,
you fought tooth and nail,

302
00:19:40,760 --> 00:19:43,860
and then it's time to
actually do the people's work.

303
00:19:44,040 --> 00:19:48,980
And if we can't get outta campaign
mode where I'm always trying to get a

304
00:19:48,980 --> 00:19:50,860
one line or a gotcha on you,

305
00:19:51,130 --> 00:19:55,540
then we can't have realistic
change happen. And really,

306
00:19:55,540 --> 00:20:00,420
I think that that drags government to a
halt. And, uh, you know, Jeff, I know,

307
00:20:00,910 --> 00:20:05,700
uh, instead of having an on off switch
for your campaigning, you talked, uh,

308
00:20:05,700 --> 00:20:10,340
a lot in your recent race for Lieutenant
Governor about having a different

309
00:20:10,580 --> 00:20:14,740
type of campaign where you
didn't go negative. And, uh, and,

310
00:20:14,740 --> 00:20:17,140
and if you wanna just
elaborate on that for a second,

311
00:20:17,360 --> 00:20:20,620
and then we'll get to Chuck with some of
his feelings on where things are broken

312
00:20:20,620 --> 00:20:21,250
as well.

313
00:20:21,250 --> 00:20:25,700
Yeah, I don't think you can, there's,
there's, I don't think you can now, uh,

314
00:20:25,700 --> 00:20:28,740
transition from a
campaign where, you know,

315
00:20:29,910 --> 00:20:32,380
if a campaign is spending 20, 30, 40,

316
00:20:32,380 --> 00:20:35,700
50 million destroying another person,

317
00:20:36,520 --> 00:20:40,660
and then you say, just
kidding, or Let's shake hands,

318
00:20:40,660 --> 00:20:42,020
or let's get back to work.

319
00:20:42,920 --> 00:20:47,060
The leadership test that
you have as a governor or a,

320
00:20:47,120 --> 00:20:51,320
a US senator or as a legislator
happens in the campaign.

321
00:20:51,780 --> 00:20:54,280
The way that you campaign the, the,

322
00:20:54,280 --> 00:20:58,800
whether or not you veto the
mailer that has the dumb picture

323
00:20:59,590 --> 00:21:04,520
that was photoshopped by a young
designer somewhere thought it would

324
00:21:04,520 --> 00:21:08,680
be funny to put a silly picture of the
opponent with some silly words next to

325
00:21:08,680 --> 00:21:13,360
it. That candidate needs to have the
maturity and the temperament to say,

326
00:21:13,520 --> 00:21:17,200
vetoed not gonna go out with my name
on it. In fact, if you put that,

327
00:21:17,590 --> 00:21:22,000
that mailer out with my name on
it, I'll condemn it. And, uh, so,

328
00:21:22,380 --> 00:21:25,400
and people sometimes are
saying, but look, uh,

329
00:21:25,400 --> 00:21:28,320
this is how the professionals
say that I have to win.

330
00:21:28,790 --> 00:21:32,440
I have to raise their negatives
and raise my positives.

331
00:21:32,440 --> 00:21:36,880
And the only way to raise their negatives
is to spend, you fill in the blank,

332
00:21:37,080 --> 00:21:41,240
whatever the amount of blank check in,
in many cases, to defeat this person,

333
00:21:41,660 --> 00:21:46,560
you have to be convinced in your
heart that that person is an evil

334
00:21:46,560 --> 00:21:51,440
person, and that you, you are the only
person who can stop them. And that's why,

335
00:21:51,530 --> 00:21:55,480
eh, we've gotta get a little dirty, we've
gotta do some things we didn't like.

336
00:21:55,480 --> 00:21:59,280
And then you're gonna go shake their
hand, look their spouse in the eye,

337
00:21:59,280 --> 00:22:02,960
look their child in the eye
after and say, it was all a joke.

338
00:22:02,960 --> 00:22:06,640
Or it was just business not
personal. No, nobody believes that.

339
00:22:08,150 --> 00:22:08,690
You know,

340
00:22:08,690 --> 00:22:13,370
in gone are the days where you can
throw away a piece of political mail and

341
00:22:13,370 --> 00:22:15,730
it's, it's gone. Um, you know,

342
00:22:15,730 --> 00:22:19,370
for those of us that have young
kids and are involved in politics,

343
00:22:19,370 --> 00:22:21,970
I have a nine and a 10 year old. Um,

344
00:22:22,270 --> 00:22:26,970
the negatives that were sent
about me will exist on Facebook

345
00:22:27,020 --> 00:22:31,610
or Twitter. They, the internet
someplace for years and years to come.

346
00:22:32,140 --> 00:22:34,410
Um, you know, so I, I think, uh,

347
00:22:34,410 --> 00:22:38,050
we as the people who are saying yes or
no to those mail pieces that come from

348
00:22:38,050 --> 00:22:41,210
our consultants, you know, and,
and I'll be the first to say,

349
00:22:41,360 --> 00:22:46,090
I've okayed a couple mail pieces that I
wish that I didn't in the past because

350
00:22:46,090 --> 00:22:50,850
they were just sill or foolish.
Um, and, and, you know, took a,

351
00:22:50,880 --> 00:22:53,970
a pot shot at someone. Um, you know,

352
00:22:53,970 --> 00:22:55,930
but those of us that are okaying,

353
00:22:55,930 --> 00:23:00,210
those mail pieces need to think about our
ability to work with that other person

354
00:23:00,660 --> 00:23:03,970
in the future. So, Chuck,
what do you think about, uh,

355
00:23:03,970 --> 00:23:05,410
the system and where it's broken?

356
00:23:06,580 --> 00:23:10,010
Uh, first of all, I wanna say that I
agree with everything that Jeff just said,

357
00:23:10,010 --> 00:23:14,490
and that, you know, the, you're talking
about the amendment process, right?

358
00:23:14,670 --> 00:23:18,570
But, but not just the amendment
process, but like, look,

359
00:23:18,570 --> 00:23:20,530
everybody's vote is fair game.

360
00:23:20,530 --> 00:23:25,050
Everybody's record is fair game
when it comes to a campaign.

361
00:23:25,270 --> 00:23:27,730
The personal stuff is not
in my opinion, but the, but,

362
00:23:27,730 --> 00:23:31,690
but the record is fair game.
But when you're talking about,

363
00:23:33,230 --> 00:23:38,170
say for example, the school code
bill or the fiscal code bill, right?

364
00:23:38,240 --> 00:23:42,820
That has 700 provisions in it
that all do different things,

365
00:23:43,360 --> 00:23:48,090
you know, that no matter how the person
person votes on that, you can attack it,

366
00:23:48,090 --> 00:23:48,490
right?

367
00:23:48,490 --> 00:23:52,530
Because there's something in there that
you can attack because they put so many

368
00:23:52,530 --> 00:23:56,450
things in there that, that,
you know, is like, okay, well,

369
00:23:56,450 --> 00:23:57,690
I'm against this thing and this thing,

370
00:23:57,690 --> 00:24:00,450
but I think I have to vote for
it because overall, whatever.

371
00:24:00,870 --> 00:24:03,450
But some people have the
courage to vote against it,

372
00:24:04,350 --> 00:24:08,010
and they vote against it because there's
something in there that to them is so

373
00:24:09,490 --> 00:24:11,120
against their, their,

374
00:24:11,120 --> 00:24:14,640
their belief system that it
overwhelms the majority of the stuff.

375
00:24:14,820 --> 00:24:19,320
And then you say, well, this
person voted against, you know,

376
00:24:19,320 --> 00:24:22,800
record school funding. Well,
yeah, but they also voted,

377
00:24:22,800 --> 00:24:25,400
but the reason they voted for
against it was this other thing.

378
00:24:25,530 --> 00:24:26,760
So it's gamesmanship.

379
00:24:26,760 --> 00:24:30,800
We know we put everything in there so
that we can attack somebody on something

380
00:24:30,800 --> 00:24:35,640
no matter how they vote. That's what
the legislator, the legislature does.

381
00:24:35,660 --> 00:24:40,040
And it's, and it's the kind of thing
that gets back to not trusting and not,

382
00:24:40,040 --> 00:24:43,240
and not liking your colleagues because it,

383
00:24:43,240 --> 00:24:45,640
because everybody knows that
those are omnibus bills.

384
00:24:45,640 --> 00:24:47,400
Everybody knows that
everything's in there.

385
00:24:47,400 --> 00:24:50,600
Everybody knows that people should be
able to vote how they want on them,

386
00:24:50,940 --> 00:24:55,400
and yet they are the source of attack
time. And again, I mean, in the, in,

387
00:24:55,400 --> 00:25:00,240
in the recent election here, we've seen
that over and over and over again, that,

388
00:25:00,240 --> 00:25:04,200
that people are attacked on bills that
are omnibus bills by pulling out one

389
00:25:04,440 --> 00:25:08,840
sentence out of the bill and saying they
voted against this popular thing that,

390
00:25:08,840 --> 00:25:12,920
now going on with that, with that, um,

391
00:25:13,240 --> 00:25:17,080
theme and what Jeff said
earlier, you know, a,

392
00:25:17,080 --> 00:25:18,640
a very good friend of mine is, is,

393
00:25:18,640 --> 00:25:22,280
is running for an office next year in
Allegheny County. And as part of that,

394
00:25:22,720 --> 00:25:25,440
we've been out talking to some

395
00:25:27,380 --> 00:25:32,150
long retired legislators, okay? And from,

396
00:25:32,150 --> 00:25:33,030
from Allegheny County,

397
00:25:34,010 --> 00:25:38,830
and I remember these guys from
back when I know Jeff served

398
00:25:38,830 --> 00:25:43,750
with some of them. And back
then, right? Back then,

399
00:25:44,490 --> 00:25:46,910
you had some incredibly intelligent,

400
00:25:49,210 --> 00:25:49,560
um,

401
00:25:49,560 --> 00:25:54,520
thoughtful people who were all
about good policy regardless

402
00:25:54,520 --> 00:25:56,120
of where it fell on the spectrum, right?

403
00:25:56,120 --> 00:25:57,680
And they worked with the
other side to get there.

404
00:25:58,310 --> 00:26:00,040
They were people who developed,

405
00:26:00,040 --> 00:26:05,000
once they got their
subject matter expertise in

406
00:26:05,000 --> 00:26:06,520
a particular thing,
they got on a committee,

407
00:26:06,520 --> 00:26:08,760
they become the subject
matter expert in that thing.

408
00:26:10,260 --> 00:26:12,600
And they were serious about policy.

409
00:26:12,600 --> 00:26:15,760
And they're so much fun to
talk to about that even now.

410
00:26:16,820 --> 00:26:19,960
And what we have now in the legislature,
and I'm not talking about you Matt,

411
00:26:19,960 --> 00:26:23,080
but, but I'm just talking about
overall watching the legislature.

412
00:26:23,430 --> 00:26:26,240
What we have now is a, is on both sides,

413
00:26:26,890 --> 00:26:31,100
people who are performative,
performative politics,

414
00:26:31,760 --> 00:26:34,940
but who don't, who, who believe
in certain things policy-wise,

415
00:26:35,240 --> 00:26:39,220
but who never accomplish any of it because
they're doing performative politics,

416
00:26:39,420 --> 00:26:40,253
right?

417
00:26:40,280 --> 00:26:43,520
And they won't work with the other side
to actually get done what they want to

418
00:26:43,520 --> 00:26:44,353
get done.

419
00:26:44,500 --> 00:26:48,880
And it's a real shame because
the losers in that are the people

420
00:26:49,330 --> 00:26:52,600
of Pennsylvania, the losers on it
on a national level in Congress,

421
00:26:52,600 --> 00:26:56,800
are the people of the country that
we cannot get anything done. Every,

422
00:26:56,800 --> 00:27:00,280
every vote is not every vote
clearly in the legislature,

423
00:27:00,280 --> 00:27:04,640
but every vote in Congress
almost is party line, right? Um,

424
00:27:05,500 --> 00:27:09,560
and I know Democrats and the legislature
complain they can't get any of their

425
00:27:09,560 --> 00:27:14,440
bills up on the floor because whatever
people are just holding press conference

426
00:27:14,440 --> 00:27:17,320
after press conference, after
press conference in Harrisburg,

427
00:27:17,810 --> 00:27:22,560
as opposed to doing the real work and
getting the job done and doing legislation

428
00:27:22,560 --> 00:27:26,520
because they will not talk to the other
side. And it's a problem on both sides,

429
00:27:26,860 --> 00:27:30,840
but I think the majority has to be
open to it first, right? I mean,

430
00:27:30,840 --> 00:27:33,760
the majority has to,
whoever the majority is,

431
00:27:34,020 --> 00:27:36,840
has to be willing to talk to the
other side to try to get stuff done.

432
00:27:36,980 --> 00:27:39,240
The minority can be willing
to talk to the other side,

433
00:27:39,420 --> 00:27:43,360
but if the majority isn't willing to
talk back, it doesn't really matter's.

434
00:27:44,680 --> 00:27:47,020
And I know people are hearing
this, Matt, and they're,

435
00:27:47,020 --> 00:27:49,780
and hearing what Chuck and I
are saying and saying, oh, oh.

436
00:27:49,780 --> 00:27:52,980
But what you're really talking
about is going back to the days of,

437
00:27:53,270 --> 00:27:56,220
of smoke filled rooms and
politicians cutting deals,

438
00:27:56,220 --> 00:27:58,100
and they're not being any
transparency and all that.

439
00:27:58,100 --> 00:28:00,500
That's not at all what
we're talking about. We're,

440
00:28:00,650 --> 00:28:05,100
what we're really saying is the same
rules that you would have in a classroom,

441
00:28:06,750 --> 00:28:11,180
uh, in your home with your
parents, with your grandparents,

442
00:28:11,330 --> 00:28:14,740
with your neighbors, uh,
when you go into a store,

443
00:28:15,450 --> 00:28:20,060
just the common decencies of being honest

444
00:28:20,160 --> 00:28:24,820
and, and keeping your word and
showing up on time, and, um,

445
00:28:24,820 --> 00:28:29,660
having discussions about important
issues with just a baseline of

446
00:28:29,660 --> 00:28:30,060
respect.

447
00:28:30,060 --> 00:28:34,980
You don't go in to people you care
about and try to mock them or make fun

448
00:28:34,980 --> 00:28:39,060
of them on social media because, you
know, that would destroy the relationship.

449
00:28:39,800 --> 00:28:43,320
You know, you don't set people up, uh,

450
00:28:43,320 --> 00:28:48,140
with comments in another
environment that's not political or

451
00:28:48,140 --> 00:28:52,300
legislative and just set them up
so that you can go viral on TikTok.

452
00:28:53,480 --> 00:28:56,820
But in politics, what, what
Chuck is talking about,

453
00:28:56,820 --> 00:29:01,660
performative people on the
stage performing for people. Uh,

454
00:29:01,660 --> 00:29:05,380
I I, I've been meeting with,
uh, some, some young, uh,

455
00:29:05,380 --> 00:29:08,660
juniors and seniors in
high school, and, um,

456
00:29:09,430 --> 00:29:12,260
ev to a person, I, very few of them,

457
00:29:12,390 --> 00:29:15,300
of the 200 or so kids that I've met with,

458
00:29:15,740 --> 00:29:18,820
maybe four or five of them think
politics is a serious business.

459
00:29:19,010 --> 00:29:21,020
They all think government is serious,

460
00:29:21,480 --> 00:29:23,780
and the work that's done
in government is serious,

461
00:29:23,780 --> 00:29:28,580
but they don't think that the
commercials and what they see on tv,

462
00:29:28,580 --> 00:29:33,020
what they read about, they, they think
it's all a, a play. It's all a joke.

463
00:29:33,520 --> 00:29:34,380
Entertainment.

464
00:29:34,600 --> 00:29:36,740
Entertainment. Yeah. You.

465
00:29:36,740 --> 00:29:40,660
Know, I, I, I wanna get
to how we fix this issue,

466
00:29:40,660 --> 00:29:42,320
but before we get there,

467
00:29:42,550 --> 00:29:47,520
I wanna talk about who has the
power to fix this issue. Uh,

468
00:29:47,520 --> 00:29:52,040
you would think that, uh, as,
as a politician, my boss is, uh,

469
00:29:52,210 --> 00:29:56,960
is always the people that have
elected me and put me there and, uh,

470
00:29:56,960 --> 00:30:01,880
you know, they have the control
to vote me out. Um, unfortunately,

471
00:30:02,300 --> 00:30:07,160
and we could get into a long conversation
about how maps are drawn, um,

472
00:30:07,160 --> 00:30:11,240
because our, our maps favor
definitely one party over another.

473
00:30:11,570 --> 00:30:13,840
So maybe the people don't have, uh,

474
00:30:13,840 --> 00:30:18,480
as much power all the time as they think
they do in congressional or legislative

475
00:30:18,760 --> 00:30:22,880
districts, um, because that district
leans heavily one way or the other.

476
00:30:23,020 --> 00:30:27,200
But isn't it the people that have the
power through the election process?

477
00:30:30,710 --> 00:30:35,340
Uh, look, I, I think people have
the power, uh, but people are,

478
00:30:35,340 --> 00:30:39,300
need to be very careful
to not be manipulated by

479
00:30:40,000 --> 00:30:43,890
people that are running for office.
And, and what do I mean by that?

480
00:30:43,890 --> 00:30:46,050
I mean that when you,

481
00:30:46,120 --> 00:30:50,770
when you hear politicians speaking
to the things that you are

482
00:30:50,770 --> 00:30:51,603
afraid of,

483
00:30:52,150 --> 00:30:57,020
but they're positioning
themselves as the answer and not

484
00:30:57,020 --> 00:31:01,700
saying, well, let's talk about how we
can solve this problem together. Or when,

485
00:31:01,700 --> 00:31:05,140
if you listen carefully to
what a politician is saying,

486
00:31:05,440 --> 00:31:10,140
and if the majority of what they're
saying is actually to get you mad at the

487
00:31:10,140 --> 00:31:12,700
person they are running against,
so they'll actually benefit.

488
00:31:13,230 --> 00:31:15,780
If you vote against
that person, then your,

489
00:31:15,780 --> 00:31:17,940
your warning lights have to go on when,

490
00:31:17,940 --> 00:31:21,700
and here's one little tell
when a politician is sarcastic

491
00:31:22,990 --> 00:31:24,860
or, and there's just
some subtleties there.

492
00:31:24,860 --> 00:31:28,940
When somebody makes up a nickname or
a rhyme for your political opponent,

493
00:31:28,960 --> 00:31:33,820
and both sides are doing it, that that
alert should go off and you should say,

494
00:31:34,040 --> 00:31:37,660
Hey, I have a lot of respect
for you, Mr. Or Mrs. Politician,

495
00:31:38,280 --> 00:31:39,500
but I'm,

496
00:31:39,530 --> 00:31:43,940
I want somebody who will be serious
about these issues and not just enter,

497
00:31:43,940 --> 00:31:47,220
entertain me or make me laugh because
you can appeal to my base instinct,

498
00:31:47,760 --> 00:31:51,700
but I want you to appeal to
something in me that wants me to,

499
00:31:51,830 --> 00:31:54,140
to be inspired, uh,

500
00:31:54,140 --> 00:31:57,620
about fixing my community or
fixing my state or my country.

501
00:31:59,010 --> 00:32:03,060
Yeah, I mean, I mean, every once in a
while, a laugh is good, right? And it,

502
00:32:03,060 --> 00:32:07,260
and it lightens the, that it can
lighten the mood and whatever,

503
00:32:07,360 --> 00:32:09,340
but overall, they want somebody who wants,

504
00:32:09,340 --> 00:32:13,740
who wants to be serious about policy
and fixing the problem, humor's good.

505
00:32:14,000 --> 00:32:18,140
But it's a question of what that
humor is, how, how personal,

506
00:32:18,140 --> 00:32:22,980
how biting the, that humor is.
Uh, but look, so, so, so Matt,

507
00:32:22,980 --> 00:32:27,020
you asked a question who, right?
Yeah. The people are in charge,

508
00:32:27,320 --> 00:32:28,780
but you know,

509
00:32:29,010 --> 00:32:33,460
it's high time that people
who are elected, right?

510
00:32:34,100 --> 00:32:38,380
Actually show leadership on, on, on
this kind of thing, saying, look,

511
00:32:39,100 --> 00:32:39,933
you know,

512
00:32:40,160 --> 00:32:45,080
we're not gonna just agree with somebody
because they're the leader of the

513
00:32:45,080 --> 00:32:48,680
party, because they're the whatever.
We're just not gonna agree. We're,

514
00:32:48,680 --> 00:32:52,920
we're not gonna just walk
in lockstep to whatever

515
00:32:53,400 --> 00:32:58,310
we're going, you know, we believe
and, and tell the truth. You know,

516
00:32:58,310 --> 00:33:03,270
tell the truth. If, if, if
there's a leader, you know,

517
00:33:03,540 --> 00:33:05,150
I can't imagine who I'm talking about,

518
00:33:05,150 --> 00:33:10,030
who's saying things that are completely
untrue and misleading people, okay?

519
00:33:10,680 --> 00:33:14,450
If the elected people
of that person's party

520
00:33:16,240 --> 00:33:20,150
at all levels, right?
Uh, uh, from down, uh,

521
00:33:20,220 --> 00:33:24,560
down the whole way, had the
courage, had the backbone,

522
00:33:24,900 --> 00:33:29,480
had a spine, and said,
you know, that's not true.

523
00:33:30,100 --> 00:33:34,770
That's not true. Was this whole
thing about is the election? Are the,

524
00:33:34,770 --> 00:33:39,290
are our elections fair? Was the election
stolen? Was this election stolen?

525
00:33:39,430 --> 00:33:43,490
Was this, was this fraud? Was that
fraud? Okay, look, I'm a lawyer.

526
00:33:43,760 --> 00:33:46,810
I litigate those things in
court. If there's evidence of it,

527
00:33:46,810 --> 00:33:49,450
if there's evidence of fraud, I'm
gonna say there's evidence of fraud.

528
00:33:49,500 --> 00:33:54,450
No matter who benefits from that,
okay? As a, as an election attorney,

529
00:33:54,740 --> 00:33:59,690
as somebody who, who cares about that
a lot, I want our elections to be fair,

530
00:33:59,900 --> 00:34:04,850
if I lose and, and there's
fraud that helps me be,

531
00:34:04,850 --> 00:34:09,170
and I, and because I say it's
fraud, so be it. The point is,

532
00:34:10,360 --> 00:34:14,370
it's not about what side you're
on, it's about what the facts are.

533
00:34:14,670 --> 00:34:18,770
And the people who are elected
to office at all levels

534
00:34:19,480 --> 00:34:22,210
have to say when they're, when, when,

535
00:34:22,210 --> 00:34:26,490
when somebody of influence in their
party is saying something that is false,

536
00:34:26,600 --> 00:34:29,010
that is misleading, that is dangerous,

537
00:34:29,280 --> 00:34:34,090
they have to have the courage to stand
up and say what that person's saying is

538
00:34:34,090 --> 00:34:35,530
false. There's no evidence of that.

539
00:34:36,360 --> 00:34:39,780
And then what happens is the
few people that, that have done,

540
00:34:39,780 --> 00:34:44,100
that have gotten their lives threatened,
have got, has been, been, you know,

541
00:34:44,340 --> 00:34:47,420
violence threatened against
them. We have to stop that.

542
00:34:47,830 --> 00:34:51,660
We have to stop having the kind
of discourse that is violent.

543
00:34:52,140 --> 00:34:54,260
We're not a third world country yet.

544
00:34:54,540 --> 00:34:58,180
Chuck. Here's what I hear
people yelling at us right now,

545
00:34:58,430 --> 00:35:00,180
because they're saying, yeah,

546
00:35:00,180 --> 00:35:05,180
but we tried nice before we
tried civil getting along.

547
00:35:05,180 --> 00:35:08,740
And you know what? It doesn't
get us anywhere. So when,

548
00:35:09,070 --> 00:35:11,820
so what I'm hearing people, cause
I heard this on the campaign,

549
00:35:12,000 --> 00:35:16,740
you need somebody who's a little rough
around the edges, who isn't, you know,

550
00:35:16,750 --> 00:35:20,100
so straight laced on, you know,
on in their personal life,

551
00:35:20,100 --> 00:35:20,933
and they're a little bit,

552
00:35:21,010 --> 00:35:25,820
a little bit willing to take risks
with their words and rough people up

553
00:35:25,820 --> 00:35:30,540
a little bit, because that's the
only way we get things done. Now,

554
00:35:30,540 --> 00:35:33,420
I know that people who are listening,
there are some who are cheering.

555
00:35:33,760 --> 00:35:38,040
I'm saying yes, that's exactly what I'm
saying. I think we have to help people,

556
00:35:39,010 --> 00:35:39,360
uh,

557
00:35:39,360 --> 00:35:44,280
understand that what we
sacrifice when we allow

558
00:35:44,300 --> 00:35:49,000
for certain kinds of behavior
is that not only does

559
00:35:49,000 --> 00:35:51,200
everybody try to imitate that behavior,

560
00:35:51,860 --> 00:35:56,080
but it becomes impossible to do all the
good things you actually cared about

561
00:35:56,080 --> 00:35:59,800
long term. Because if you do it the
wrong way, if you don't persuade people,

562
00:36:01,060 --> 00:36:03,880
the tidal wave comes
in, you get thrown out,

563
00:36:03,980 --> 00:36:06,600
all of the things that
you thought you won,

564
00:36:06,960 --> 00:36:11,440
<laugh> are suddenly gone because there's
no, you haven't persuaded the public,

565
00:36:12,290 --> 00:36:16,760
uh, that, that your idea is the right
way. If you get it by hook or by crook,

566
00:36:16,810 --> 00:36:18,160
there's a consequence.

567
00:36:20,000 --> 00:36:23,390
There's nothing wrong with unconventional
rhetoric and unconventional

568
00:36:23,390 --> 00:36:28,390
politicians and roughing people up.
And, and by that I mean verbally not,

569
00:36:28,390 --> 00:36:30,750
not physically, right? And, and.

570
00:36:30,820 --> 00:36:32,830
Clarifying that. Yeah. Right?

571
00:36:33,840 --> 00:36:38,680
There's nothing wrong with any of that
if you're telling the truth, right?

572
00:36:38,680 --> 00:36:42,000
Yeah. But if you're making up facts,
if you're, if you're telling lies,

573
00:36:42,000 --> 00:36:42,833
if you're whatever,

574
00:36:42,900 --> 00:36:46,280
and you somehow get a bunch of people
to actually believe those lies,

575
00:36:46,550 --> 00:36:51,040
it's dangerous. Listen, as
I said, I as an attorney,

576
00:36:51,250 --> 00:36:55,440
as an election attorney, I'm a partisan
short, but above all, I'm, I'm,

577
00:36:55,440 --> 00:36:57,800
I'm for a fair election, right?

578
00:36:58,340 --> 00:37:03,240
And if I looked at every
one of those things

579
00:37:03,240 --> 00:37:06,090
that was said about, you know,

580
00:37:06,090 --> 00:37:08,810
the election and all of that stuff, and,

581
00:37:08,810 --> 00:37:11,610
and whether is it fraud and this was
done, this was this and this and that,

582
00:37:11,640 --> 00:37:15,810
fine, bring it to a courtroom.
That's what we're there for.

583
00:37:15,810 --> 00:37:19,530
That's what courtrooms are for.
Nobody brought evidence. So,

584
00:37:19,530 --> 00:37:21,890
and here we are two years later,

585
00:37:22,610 --> 00:37:26,250
still saying the same things that
there's still no evidence for,

586
00:37:26,510 --> 00:37:29,970
and it's a disservice.
Let's debate issues.

587
00:37:29,970 --> 00:37:31,930
Let's debate where we
want the country to go.

588
00:37:31,970 --> 00:37:33,770
Let's debate where we
want the state to go.

589
00:37:33,970 --> 00:37:38,450
Let's stop the performative nonsense.
Let's stop lying to people and, and,

590
00:37:38,450 --> 00:37:41,850
and let's start solving problems. Cause
there was a lot of problems to be fixed.

591
00:37:42,310 --> 00:37:46,730
And, and, you know, uh, Congress
goes and does very little,

592
00:37:46,950 --> 00:37:50,530
the legislature goes up there to,
to Harrisburg and does very little.

593
00:37:50,530 --> 00:37:54,930
And what they do do, in my view,
they screw up and, and you know, it,

594
00:37:54,980 --> 00:37:57,970
it needs to stop. We need to start
working together again like we used to.

595
00:37:59,340 --> 00:38:03,150
Well, I wanna get in, uh,
one more commercial break
before the end of the show.

596
00:38:03,150 --> 00:38:06,870
When we come back, the question
I'm going to ask, uh, is,

597
00:38:06,940 --> 00:38:11,590
what is an issue or a couple
issues, uh, that either of,

598
00:38:11,590 --> 00:38:15,310
you know, the other would
disagree with you on? And, uh,

599
00:38:15,310 --> 00:38:20,110
and after we have that conversation,
after we have that conversation,

600
00:38:20,110 --> 00:38:24,470
I wanna see how we can get
to, uh, to some common ground.

601
00:38:24,480 --> 00:38:26,430
So we'll be back right after this message.

602
00:38:29,220 --> 00:38:33,870
You're listening to commonalities
where guests find common ground through

603
00:38:34,190 --> 00:38:35,190
uncommon conversations.

604
00:38:35,920 --> 00:38:39,400
We'll be back after this brief
break to recognize our sponsors.

605
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606
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607
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613
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617
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618
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619
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620
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621
00:39:46,100 --> 00:39:49,110
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622
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623
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624
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625
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626
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627
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628
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629
00:40:13,040 --> 00:40:17,710
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630
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631
00:40:21,880 --> 00:40:26,110
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632
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633
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634
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635
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636
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637
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638
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639
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640
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641
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643
00:41:11,560 --> 00:41:16,050
You're listening to commonalities
on WBS five 90 am 1 0 1

644
00:41:16,050 --> 00:41:17,330
0.1 fm,

645
00:41:17,430 --> 00:41:21,850
and any place you download
your favorite podcasts. Uh,

646
00:41:21,850 --> 00:41:25,050
I'm with Jeff Coleman, who
is a conservative Republican,

647
00:41:25,550 --> 00:41:30,170
and Chuck Pasco, who is a progressive
Democrat. Now, before the break,

648
00:41:30,170 --> 00:41:32,210
I said my next question was going to be,

649
00:41:32,210 --> 00:41:36,400
what's an issue that you guys disagree
on and how do you come to some common

650
00:41:36,400 --> 00:41:39,680
ground? We have just under four
minutes to wrap up the show,

651
00:41:39,970 --> 00:41:44,160
so we're gonna have to speak in,
uh, in sound bites. But gentlemen,

652
00:41:44,160 --> 00:41:45,080
tell me what you think.

653
00:41:45,830 --> 00:41:47,680
Well, Chuck is wrong on all the issues,

654
00:41:47,680 --> 00:41:50,160
but the first one that
he is wrong on is, is I,

655
00:41:50,160 --> 00:41:54,920
I'd say probably education reform.
I support, um, a competitive system.

656
00:41:54,950 --> 00:41:59,080
I think school choice is a good idea
and, uh, he thinks it's a bad idea.

657
00:41:59,540 --> 00:42:02,360
And, uh, we, we can start there.
And there are many others.

658
00:42:04,800 --> 00:42:09,120
<Laugh> and Jeff is wrong on everything,
but, um, no, I, you know, I mean,

659
00:42:09,180 --> 00:42:10,200
you know, seriousness,

660
00:42:10,200 --> 00:42:14,320
we have a public school system that
is meant to bring this community,

661
00:42:14,570 --> 00:42:15,600
to bring our, our,

662
00:42:15,600 --> 00:42:20,480
our communities together to educate
people who are rich and poor,

663
00:42:20,480 --> 00:42:25,200
black and white, all races,
all backgrounds together,
and learn to get along.

664
00:42:25,350 --> 00:42:26,800
Part of, part of the,

665
00:42:27,140 --> 00:42:32,080
the problem in my view recently
is that we have allowed

666
00:42:32,080 --> 00:42:32,960
and, and,

667
00:42:32,960 --> 00:42:37,880
and perpetuated and promoted that
separation to the point where we do

668
00:42:37,880 --> 00:42:40,080
not have, you know, the, the,

669
00:42:40,080 --> 00:42:44,080
the kind of diversity in a lot of
public schools that we need to,

670
00:42:44,080 --> 00:42:47,000
so that all people can work
together and learn to work together,

671
00:42:47,000 --> 00:42:49,760
learn to get along, learn to
understand each other's cultures,

672
00:42:50,160 --> 00:42:53,360
learn to understand each other's
backgrounds, and respect it.

673
00:42:53,940 --> 00:42:58,360
And we've set up a system
not only where we have,

674
00:42:58,810 --> 00:43:03,600
uh, uh, allowed, uh, that
that sort of thing to occur,

675
00:43:03,900 --> 00:43:05,680
but also to,

676
00:43:06,330 --> 00:43:10,440
to subsidize that choice,
subsidize that choice.

677
00:43:11,010 --> 00:43:14,240
It used to be that people could make that
choice, but it was on their own dime.

678
00:43:14,240 --> 00:43:16,480
And now the, the, the, the, the,

679
00:43:16,480 --> 00:43:21,360
the people who live in poor communities
who live in poor school districts whose

680
00:43:21,360 --> 00:43:26,160
school districts need resources are being
made to subsidize those choices made

681
00:43:26,160 --> 00:43:30,760
by, by wealthier more,
more ad uh, advantaged, uh,

682
00:43:30,850 --> 00:43:32,120
uh, people. And it's,

683
00:43:32,120 --> 00:43:36,040
and it's not allowing the
understanding to that we used to have,

684
00:43:36,690 --> 00:43:37,720
we all went to school,

685
00:43:37,720 --> 00:43:40,880
those of us who went to public school
with people of all backgrounds,

686
00:43:40,880 --> 00:43:42,240
and we learned to respect that.

687
00:43:42,620 --> 00:43:46,600
But you know, what I hear
in Chuck is substantively,

688
00:43:46,770 --> 00:43:49,560
he and I would agree that, um,

689
00:43:49,560 --> 00:43:51,960
there are challenged
areas in Pennsylvania,

690
00:43:51,960 --> 00:43:55,520
especially in the urban areas
that have underperforming schools.

691
00:43:56,010 --> 00:43:59,760
If we can both agree on that,
we can both debate the solution.

692
00:43:59,990 --> 00:44:01,560
I would say it's a competitive system.

693
00:44:01,850 --> 00:44:05,240
He would say it is getting more
resources to public schools.

694
00:44:05,750 --> 00:44:10,000
That's where you have the debate and
that's how you can have a legitimate

695
00:44:10,000 --> 00:44:14,960
outcome, uh, where, where both sides
can come to some kind of an agreement.

696
00:44:15,020 --> 00:44:19,160
But we have to agree on some of the
problems and on this issue, I know we do.

697
00:44:20,450 --> 00:44:24,400
We used to be able to as, as parties
and as, as as elected officials,

698
00:44:24,680 --> 00:44:28,000
whatever used to be able to agree
on what the problem was and then,

699
00:44:28,000 --> 00:44:29,280
and then argue about the solution.

700
00:44:29,470 --> 00:44:33,240
It's gotten to the point we can't even
agree on what, on what the problem is.

701
00:44:33,240 --> 00:44:34,073
That's true.

702
00:44:34,950 --> 00:44:38,280
Well, guys, we have, uh, come to
the end of our time here together.

703
00:44:38,280 --> 00:44:43,280
You guys have been great guests and, uh,
I really appreciate you signing on for,

704
00:44:43,280 --> 00:44:47,680
uh, for our inaugural episode of
Commonality. So thank you so much.

705
00:44:47,730 --> 00:44:52,120
In just, uh, uh, under 10
seconds each, any final thoughts?

706
00:44:52,710 --> 00:44:56,120
Well, this is an important show. I wish
you the best and I hope you have many,

707
00:44:56,120 --> 00:44:58,280
many more conversations
just like this one.

708
00:44:59,030 --> 00:45:03,840
Matt, it's been an honor to be on your
first show. Uh, I wish you the best, uh,

709
00:45:03,930 --> 00:45:06,440
uh, thank you for trying to
do this. It is, it's awesome.

710
00:45:07,380 --> 00:45:09,100
Thank you both. And, uh,

711
00:45:09,100 --> 00:45:13,820
hopefully we will have you tuning in
for more episodes of commonalities.

712
00:45:14,300 --> 00:45:16,700
Everyone have a great weekend.
May God bless you all.

713
00:45:23,010 --> 00:45:24,900
This has been commonalities,

714
00:45:25,210 --> 00:45:29,300
a show where guests find common
ground through uncommon conversations.

715
00:45:29,500 --> 00:45:32,460
Copyright 2022 coordinated 360,

716
00:45:32,640 --> 00:45:36,180
all public rebroadcast should be done
with prior written approval from Matthew

717
00:45:36,180 --> 00:45:41,100
Dowling. All requests should be sent
to info@coordinatedthreesixty.com.

718
00:45:41,100 --> 00:45:43,460
Thank you for listening to commonalities.

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